Wednesday, August 03, 2005

Organic Golf in Australia

I've posted a couple of items recently on efforts by golf course owners and developers to "green" their industry here in the US. Treehugger points us to the Kabi Organic Golf Course in Australia, a course that goes even further in the direction of "sustainable golf" (feel free to take a whack at that phrase):
Here are 18 holes worth of organic certification by the Biological Farmers Association (BFA). Meaning it’s free of “any synthetic fertilisers, pesticides and or any other chemicals that are traditional ones used on golf courses.” What’s more, the clubhouse restaurant lists a menu of organic beef, chicken, and herbs. Or feast upon oranges, lemons, limes, mandarins and grapefruits from the courses’s organic orchard. And if you need to take a load off your hind, then the compost toilets await your deposit, so they can feed any liquid nutrient back to the courses’s forests, via sand filters. Aside from the prolific bird life that enjoys the 120 acres of such forests (covering over a third of the property) there is also abundant wildlife, such as wallabies and kangaroos (see below), who “have the right of way on the course at all times.”

I tend to agree with commenters from past posts that golf courses are indulgent uses of land to entertain well-off white guys... Do these kinds of developments change that?

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